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challenges and in san francisco we did just that. in fact, when we signaled from our technology company that is they were telling us that our payroll tax was a job-killing effort here that we had to change it. what we went ahead and fixed and it and got it done and after the dishandling of the redevelopment towards find a lasting solution to fund affordable house and is did that with the creation of affordable housing fund 30 million-dollar a year for the next 30 years to build affordable housings and to insentive eyes builders to get more housing on their sites and and invite police and firefighters into an emergency responders commute in san francisco to hmm with the down payments of the first too time home buyers efforts we were asked to vest? our neighborhood park and is streets and we did just that with our million dollar general obligation bond to build and construct more open space most importantly, we put san franciscans back to work and we have a growing economy and we have invested in our city. so the year of 20 if we will, was about getting everything done. and when we d
, technology, or whether it's tourism, and all the other great things that are happening in our city. and in fact we invested in 2012 in kid s f a special program we got funding from from the government federal department. labor to create the technology training center tech s f to reach out to disadvantaged kids in our city and make sure that they are getting the skill sets and the support that they need to so they can get in and really help us get rid of this digital guide that we suffer from and continue to suffer from in many of our communities and so transit center district plan, it's approved in september, if you see the cranes going up - you will know and you should realize that this center will represent 27,000 jobs just in that corridor. four -- of thousand new homes will be built as a result of that center and one thousand new hotel roonrooms and dwell acres of new open space and you are going to ask me where is that open space going to come from? imagine this it will be open space that is above the current surface ground, new spaces with the connection of all the to
to prevent them? >> guest: how do we work to prevent those? we have technologies, cybertechnologies, prevention technologies. we spend a lot of time looking at detection technologies but again if we got the attack that would hurt our critical infrastructure to which the president referred resiliency and redundancy and response and recovery programs like we did with hurricane sandy. >> host: peter dumont as president ceo of air traffic controller association. mr. dumont your answer to that question? >> guest: there have been attacks on the system. they are not well publicized and they're not talked about because it's confidential information in office we don't want any people to know how the air traffic control system works. it's difficult to explain it on a soundbite. it's happened in alaska. what's being done now is we have very adjunct infrastructure for air traffic control. it's been around since the late 50's, early 60's antigenic so different equipment. right now we are in a modernization phase where we are modernizing the land-based air traffic control system to state-based sa
. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre and drive down and take a look at the paramount and so if there is a play that is happening and so the first thing that i tell people is go to jack land square and you will be surprised that we have a square and so shore line and it is the it could be the giving of great say food and go see things that inspire me about oakland is again it's ability to change. for every think that you would every say negative about oakland, i can say ten positives we are our own city. oakland to know it, is to love it.. >> (applause) all right. so thank you mayor khan and now we have for san francisco coming up and to sso to welcome mayor lee welcome kristine row wish senator vice senior vice president of service area of case zero permanenta. >> thank you peculiar
's really about technology. because none of these unconventional shale plays would matter if we didn't have the tech to make it economical to drill it. what we really have is an energy technology revolution and these advances aren't unique to north america. they're spreading all over the globe, and who's spearheading this transformation? who represents the vanguard of the oil revolution and its intellectual property? easy. that's core labs. clb. i like to think of it as a technology company that happens to be in the oil service business. core's proprietary technology helps oil companies figure out where to drill. it also helps them squeeze more crude out of existing reservoirs. now, core labs got hit hard today, down $3.41, 2.63%. the company just reported a terrific quarter. 7 cent earnings beat off $1.15 basis. revenue coming in higher than expected up 11% year over year. and raising its guidance for next quarter. don't have a lot of companies doing that. i think the stock bounces back and then some tomorrow. typically core labs is one of those stocks that seems to get hit every tile time
for that kind of product. we think there's significant growth opportunities there. >> how as technology enabled new things in your business? i think the marriage of technology and health care has been so exciting. >> yeah. well, innovation is what we're all about and technology. it really starts with us being able to better target compounds and pharmaceuticals. in all areas now. we talk a lot about personalized medicine. i think we're making great strides. it's difficult science. we still have a lot of work to do. our ability to better detect who's going to respond to a particular therapy for the clinical development process has improved dramatically. that's why we're starting to see products through earlier. the other area i'm excited about is convergent technologies. how do you take a device along with a pharmaceutical product, which johnson & johnson is perfectly suited to do, and really transform the way patients are treated? that's another exciting -- >> also transformative what you're doing in oncology. talk to us about the products in the pipeline in terms of oncology. where are we in th
a billion dollar technology to find these guys. money was spent? we into you find out how they're spending it. you might agree, money not well spent. ♪ whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery says seth saw scott girl vo: i'm pretty conservative. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. expedia. find yours. neil: all right. we learned that they are really focusing on the backpacks, not necessarily the guys. all technologies to track down what it believes are the suspects. how does that work? over my comprehension the technology aspects horatio, speed. the concerts on that capability. makes the challenge of sifting through literally thousand thousands much more durable. neil: is in the carter of the pictures you had, this particular one, it looks fairly, a lot of the ones that have seen a v
are inventive, creative, technologically brilliant, these bets are starting to backfire. meanwhile, other companies decide to focus here. this is -- remember the 310 million? and when t right, it's nothing short of magnificent. especially on one more ugly day like today. let's use the earnings reports just from this week to drive home the point. start with verizon, one of my absolute favorite companies, reporting outstanding growth, adding subscribers and simultaneously getting each subscriber on average to pay more. pay more for the service because they're selling more smartphones, data hogs. incredible numbers. i can't believe that verizon has 93 million subscribers. that's almost one in three of all the people here. even better, verizon has nary a subscriber here or here. that means it can't disappoint, because if you have customers in this place or that place, they're letting you down! they're not buying! they're not doing what we thought they'd do. so verizon represents the best we have, domestic security growth, terrific balance sheet, and don't forget, a 4% yield. of course, it's n
and stealth technology and ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may be the way it has been able to avoid the budget cutters in washington. ha >> "washington journal," continues. host: we are talking about the roles of security cameras in asian oil security. welcome to the program. talk to us about your thoughts and feelings regarding the role of public and private cameras in national security and the impact of these cameras. seen what we have historically is that public cameras are not good at preventing crime. this has come up in the context of london and the united kingdom, which has some of the largest, most saturated cctv areas. the studies have shown that these cameras are not good for prevention purposes. the next question is are they good for solving crimes? what we have seen in london, which is one of the most saturated areas, is that the cameras are not good at solving crimes. a police steady in london shows that for every 1000 camera there was only one crime that was solved. you have a question of effectiveness. what we see is that they are not. we hear. they did not help to so
affected technology along the highest traffic areas on the border. to expedite travel and trade, reducing weight times, the budget requests an additional 3500 port officers, 1600 paid for by appropriation. the increase to the emigration user fees that have not been adjusted since 2001. the budget in vests and recapitalization of coast guard the seven national security cut her. -- cutter. and the response of smart and effective enforcement of immigration laws. and the integrity of the system through initiatives such as deferred action for childhood arrivals and greater use of prosecutorial discretion. -- budget makes significant its more cost efficient like a nationwide implementation of secure communities. adherents to work side related laws. while continuing to support alternatives to the attention reform and immigrant immigration efforts. comprehensive immigration reform will help us continue to build on these efforts and strengthen border security by enabling dhs to focus on criminals, human smugglers. next to safeguard as secure as cyberspace, this makes significant investments to str
, the advancing america's networking and information technology research and development act of 2013. h.r. 967 is a good bipartisan bill which i was pleased to join mrs. lummis from wyoming and mr. hall from texas in introducing. h.r. 967 is largely based on a 2009 house-passed bill that was ntroduced by then-chairman gordon and ranking member hull. but this has some updates and reflects changing to the -- changes to the information and technology landscape as well as policy and management recommendations made by an outside panel of experts charged with evaluating nitr-d program. the program involves a collaboration of 15 federal resedge and development agencies, each contributing its own unique expertise and effort. to ensure that we make most effective use of our federal r&d resources and remain a leader in these fields. h.r. 967 requires that all 15 agencies come together to develop and periodically update a strategic plan for federal invest. s in -- investments in i.t. r&d. h.r. 967 will increase support, calls for increased support for large scale long-term interdisciplinary research in i
as using effectiveness rate as your only measure. as we continue to put in place of the technology according to the plant has minute to congress, we will live creature continents that we will have situational awareness. thatl share with you bet is an inherent problem, knowing the actual denominator. >> i thought it bizarre that we measure our success by the people we ketch but not focusing on the people who got away. is an inherent problem. >> it is a number that is used as one of the many that taken gives you an overall picture. >> the department would have to gain effective control over high risk sectors along the border. tucson, theat the rio grande sector and the laredo sector. two in texas and one in arizona. is if they know where they're going to concentrate their efforts, they're going to redirect their efforts into areas that are not as secure. >> this is the way it will work. all sectors will have protectors when in them. you want to fit your resources where the traffic is greatest. if it shifts, the resources will ship. able better to predict where we think that will move
attribute the not be all of its radars and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and the ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. >> what is the difference between e f-35 and the f-22? 22 has had its share of technical troubles. the was supposed to be height and fighter. the replacement for the f-15. it is a real high performance fighter. it is meant to win against any potential adversary in dogfights. to have fewer f-22 and then you would have more of the f-35. , forwould be the mainstay the next 40 or 50 years. if you are fighting against a sophisticated adversary, the f- 22 are going in and they are fighting in the air against the adversaries of combat aircraft. the f-35 comes then and there are carrying the bombs that will take out the other military targets. they are the second wave that come in with -- to do the real heavy lifting. these are planes that are supposed to be all purpose. the f-35 is supposed to be able to provide support to combat troops on the ground if they're fighting and some
technological society in the world. google knows everything about you, voluntarily. we talked about this yesterday. and now we're getting into, again, how much does the government know about you? if you look up how to make a bomb on any website, he has -- >> it's a whole chapter about how actually, these guys, reading his book, it makes you think these guys didn't know what they were doing. what he talks about is the future of stuff where governments can't get in at all. so they actually really won't be able to crack all of this stuff. but the true, smart criminals, and he even talks about the drug cartels in mexico have started to figure this out, who only communicate through encrypted communications. also, there's some crazy stuff going on. so it's very interesting. we will talk to him about that but also we should be talking about this news. >> let's talk about a few other stocks that you should keep your eye on this morning, as well. all of these are after the bell movers have last night. texas instruments posting better than expected first quarter earnings and revenue. and the
. the technology helping give the firefighters the upper hand in the fight against wildfires. >>> and why the lunch lady won't carry a gun on campus after all. >>> and today was day one of the warmup we have been expecting to arrive in the bay area. and still at this hour, in the upper 70s. concord, fairfield, clear skies for now. we'll see fog on the coast. but the seven-day forecast has even more warming heading our way. we'll look at that when we come right back. >>> in tonight's class action, clamoring to get in, a record number applied to the state's uc system, making it harder than decades to get in. there is a release of stats showing a drop of out of state students, uc has been accepting more students from outside of california in recent years because they pay much higher tuition, helping to compensate for some budget cuts. >>> and the governor wants to overhaul the way k-12 schools are funded. and a new poll shows that the majority of people in california like the idea. a poll shows that 78% of adults favor the plan to give local school districts more control on how they spend their money.
to using facial recognition software to narrow it down. they will use all pieces of technology to try to narrow it down. bill: do you feel safe to say that the technology has made it easier or in ways has it complicated investigations like this? >> i think the more information is the better. you always have this management problem. if you get three terabytes of information that is lot a manage. i'm sure law enforcement loves to have this in the world of camera phones, the data available to try to track someone is a huge advantage. bill: what did you make of the rather overt public appeal for information? >> i think we've seen pretty dramatic developments over the last 24 hours. on the first day they asked for videos and pictures. that's to be expected. yesterday, and of course now i'm losing track, seems if this was an appeal we're running out of clues here and we want the public's help. within 24 hours of that first announcement or that announcement sort of opening it up i think we had a big break yesterday. bill: i think the hunch is to conclude what you just referred to. they're pe
technology may be the most powerful tool they have to help put a anytime face trace galt gear live in our west coast newsroom to explain how it works. >> while the debate goes on, megyn, on whether to release the surveillance pictures of potential suspects. we can tell you that authorities are saying that they are, quote, pretty clear of the man's face. pretty compelling stuff they say. and it appears to be a younger man. so let me show you how this facial recognition technology works. it's all about measuring the facial features. for example, the eye socket depth, cheekbone shape, the distance between the eyes, the nose width and the jaw line length. they take all these numbers and come up with numerical code or facial print. not the size of a fingerprint but still very very close. e tter of picture, clearly the better chance they hav matching it now, what happens is in mo cases, in fact we use an intern, let's show this video if you are just trying to identify the person is who they say they are that process is simple. take the person's driver's license. take a picture of them, facial c
a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stoitself if it h to. the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. ♪ >> it is 23 minutes past the hour. israel is joining written and france and accusing syrian resident of using chemical weapons last month. based on visual evidence, he believes the legal nerve agent was probably used. rebels. a car bomb exploded outside the french embassy in tripoli this morning. two french guards were injured in that blast. the tsa is delaying plans to let airline passengers carried pocket knives and some sporting equipment onto airplanes. it has been opposed by flight attendants, air marshals and some 9/11 family members. the delay will allow it to review the issue. back now to dagen and connell. connell: very nice. what a crazy story. i appreciated. moving right along. thank you. dagen: apple could make some history this afternoon. posting its biggest second-quarter sales. connell: what are the analysts participating? this is the big one tonight.
on the data. lori: will you look at technology stocks, apple in pretty good and go earnings are not robust at all comment and staying clear of those and perhaps sticking with the offensive things that continue to lead at least as leaders into the rally? >> i wouldn't exclude technology here for a few reasons. number one, when you look at the performance of tech versus the s&p or the value segment of the standard and poor's, we have a pretty good underperformance so we had some significant lagging and some notable names have been dragging down the index but ultimately if you look at the balance sheets that are relatively clean, relatively consistent cash flow from many of these, many of them are beginning to take dividendss or maturing and you can buy many attractive valuations. i wouldn't run away from technology. i would sharpen my pencil and decide which one you want to own as part of a diversified portfolio. lori: with apple shares, is that an opportunity for you? >> apple as an indication, broader indication of what is going on with technology, speak to it that way, a plastic example o
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings within a five blocks rand sent ockwes outiles around. >> i was actually picked up and th fy bout te end of m
with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body eds. each of your bodies. it's part of the sleep number collection-innovations that individualize the way you sleep. from the perfect pillow ... to temperature-balancing bedding. and it's the only place you can save $400 on the only memory foam bed with sleep number technology that adjusts to each of you. plus special financing on all beds. you will only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort. individualized. to find your store, visit sleepnumber.com. >>> i am joined by senator chuck schumer, democrat from new york. and south carolina republican senator lindsey graham with whom we just mentioned cooperated and came up recently with a bipartisan immigration bill. i want to get to that as well the effect of boston on that discussion. let me first ask you, you heard congressman mccaul written a letter to some of the feds saying i wanted to know what you knew about this older suspect. it seems that in fact this is a man who did come
how to connect our technology, people and ideas and figure out how to cooperate and most importantly make a commitment to prevent these deaths from happening. 10 years ago there was a young woman named lenora alexander, she was a healthy 11-year-old irl and she underwent elective surgery to correct something at a prestigious hospital. the awoke at 2:00 a.m., victim of respiratory arrest, caused by a drug that was intended to ease her pain. but if she had been monitored continuously after the surgery, hospital staff and lenora may have been alerted and leah would probably have been rescued. but there are other sort of preventable deaths that deals with washing hands, transferring of infections when hands aren't washed properly. monitoring has already picked up by lenora's tragic situation. her situation is not unique, unfortunately. a summit came together to figure out what can we do to solve the problem going back to the coordination, cooperation that i spoke about earlier. the fact is at this patient safety, technology and science summit, people, trained professionals came togethe
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
announcer ] this is a reason to look twice. this is a stunning work of technology. the 2013 lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. >>> devastating. >> i have been a member of the fire department for 26 years. these guys were my friends. one of them was my city secretary. he had access to our facebook page that we can't get into because that was his little job, and i talked to him everyday. now he is not here. it's devastating. and that's -- that's all i can say about it. >> that was the mayor of west, texas. tommy muska talking about the volunteer firefighters killed this week in the huge fertilizer plant explosion. >> so powerful, it registered as a seismic event and leveled par
memorial day. >>> leading sectors were energy and technology, ahead of the after the bell earnings. the dow ended the day 19 points higher and the s&p 500 added 7. the price of gold rebounded today, surging nearly $26 to $1,421 announced. but last week as the price of gold was falling, investors pulled $2.7 billion out of gold exchanged traded funds. most of the money was invested in international stock. >> turning to market focus. texas instruments reported the profits were higher than last quarter. shares gained 1.5% at the dloes and were up on the earnings news after the bell. >>> microsoft was the bigger dow gainer today and an activist hedge fund is taking a $2 billion stake in that company. they are bidding up microsoft up more than 3.5%. >> haliburton was the top performer and they are close to settling claims from the deep water horizon explosion. it's set aside a billion for settlement cost, that -- aside from that, the operations report reported strong earnings and the investors were pleased to see progress from the between -- 2010 explosion. >> shares for general electric near th
talking about the new technology about making identification. a lot of times it's about whether the person looks into the camera and the good lighting. i want to know the quality of the pictures you saw from the scene. and number two, does the fbi have names to put to the pictures? >> two very good questions. it's entirely possible based on one of the pictures that i saw that facial identification could lead to an identification to at least one of the two men. i'm sorry, the second question? >> the second one is whether they have names, whether they know who they are? >> well, at last report they didn't. the last word i heard from my source was that they didn't have names for these individuals, but they were hoping that someone in the law enforcement community would have a name. that's why they disseminated the photographs and they are asking for help in tracking these guys down. it's possible between then and now they have located them, they have identified them and they are closing in, but we don't know that at this hour. >> rick, thank you. >> sure. >> okay. so it's obvious the photos o
about video imaging and identification technology. that technology is used by the boston police department and every major police department. what we can basically do, we can take an image of an individual, which i think is what they are doing here, and we can run them through a database. if they have ever been arrested anywhere in the united states, we can pretty much determine who they are. so i think th's what they are doing at this time, sean. >> what do you think, james? >> yeah. and there's your passports, driver's license, a number of resources that they can go. data banks are very extensive at this point in time. with respect to the press conference, you know, i think over the last couple of days they are a little dismayed about the amount of information that has been released and some of it by mistake. i think they are reacting and recalling back a little bit. >> it's a very bizarre period this afternoon where you had media all over the place. we have suspects, he's on his way to the courthouse, he's not on his way to the courthouse, he is on his way to the courthouse,
] this is a stunning work of technology. this is the 2013 lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. shoot. now with the share everything plan from verizon, connect your camera, along with your smartphone and tablet. all your devices connected by one simple plan on the powerful network. record video. connect more. so you can do more. the share everything plan from verizon. add additional devices like the samsung galaxy camera for $5 monthly access. >> mike: we now know that tamerlan tsarnaev, the bombing suspect who died friday in a shootout with police, spent the first six months of 2012 in russia. what was he doing there? well, here to discuss former cia officer claire lopez and former israeli defense force officer mark kahlberg. claire, this chechnya connection is troubling, may be the key to understanding. what is so important that we need to know about the brother, the chechnya connection, and his trip to russia? >> well, governor, chechnya is a jihad intjihad now to inteto ya. their online web posting, especially the "usa today" channel set up by tamerlan, the ol
? is there facial recognition technology? or do they have to rely on people saying i know that guy? >> there is facial recognition technology, but to tell you the truth, honestly, when i was in a little kid i met a hero detective who solved a very tough case involving a sniper and i said how did you do it? and he wrote something that i can't repeat on the air, but it was basically knock on doors and get off of your derriere. facial recognition can only take you so far. i think it will be a member of the public. the reporting has been extraordinary, i think cnn, you guys, fox and msnbc have really done a very good job. and part of that is getting evidence in there that they think is important but when strung together it will come together, but is a very human intensive process. all of the photographs and video, really have to go through a set of eyes not a computer. >> michael: yeah, and that's amazing, and of course that's why we had you on brian, to talk about exactly how good of job we have done covering this story. but we really appreciate your input, beca
like to see, look, if mcdonald's can come out with killer products, apple -- are they both technology companies? is that where we are right now? >> apple has come out with incredible products. amazing products that have changed the world. >> that was the old days and the yankees used to be -- >> the ipad is only three years old, man. come on, give them a break. >> no. the market won't give them a break. i like the product, but who am i? >> that's complicated. >> it was not a rhetorical -- you know, we're not trying to figure out exactly whoi am. >> oh, okay. >> what we're trying to figure out how do they make i tunes better and how you want them to come out and say samsung, you're history because we have this. instead of samsung having, what? eight pages. >> you're not going get that in an earnings report. >> someone innovates and someone else comes in with a pretty good or good enough and that's why people are talking about the lower end and the medium end. >> there are some people who their samsung phones have technology whether it's the ability to change language quickly and a numb
or were part of a larger terrorist organization. >> brown: and we look at how technology allowed police and thpu t >> suarez: plus, we get the perspective of mark shields and david brooks on terror's return to u.s. soil and the rest of the week's news. nighrown: that's all ahead on s "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: it's been an extraordinary scene and it continues, as boston spent the day locked down by a manhunt for the second brother authorities believe was involved in this week's marathon bombing. that's come after a violent confrontation overnight that left the other bombing suspect a
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
comfortable sleep number bed: the only bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. it's part of the sleep number collection-innovations that individualize the way you sleep. from the perfect pillow ... to temperature-balancing bedding. and it's the only place you can save $400 on the only memory foam bed with sleep number technology that adjusts to each of you. plus special financing on all beds. you will only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort. individualized. to find your store, visit sleepnumber.com. have hail damage to both their cars. ted ted is trying to get a hold of his insurance agent. maxwell is not. he's on geico.com setting up an appointment with an adjuster. ted is now on hold with his insurance company. maxwell is not and just confirmed a 5:30 time for tuesday. ted, is still waiting. yes! maxwell is out and about... with ted's now ex-girlfriend. wheeeee! whoo! later ted! online claims appointments. just a click away on geico.c
's because of years of federal support to develop hydrofracking technology. the eastern gas shales project was an initiative the federal government began back in 1976 before hydrofracking was a mature industry. the project set up and funded dozens of pilot demonstration projects with universities and private gas companies that tested drilling and fracturing methods. this investment by the federal government was instrumental in the development of the commercial extraction of natural gas from shale. in fact, microseismic imaging, a critical tool used in fracking, was originally developed by sandia national laboratory, a federal energy laboratory. the industry was also supported through tax breaks and subsidies. in fact, mitchell energy vice president dan stewart said in an interview that mitchell energy's first horizontal well was subsidized by the federal government. mr. mitchell said, and i quote -- "d.o.e., that's the department of energy, d.o.e. started it and other people took the ball and ran with it. you cannot diminish d.o.e.'s involvement." so the basis of the natural gas revolution
streets, near schools, the only technology that should be near a child in a school is a computer and not a gun. especially the ones that have these kinds of magazines that really only belong on the battlefields of our country and may have been purchased in gun shows without crime cal background checks. i think you have to be able to work in a bipartisan fashion to put together the coalition that can successfully pass that kind of legislation. >> go ahead. >> in terms of the political tactics right now not working in washington, is there something you would do right now to change what is essentially a stalling of these political tactics? >> why don't you start, mr. lynch. >> if i could follow up. i think most people know my background. a few years back, more than a few years back my cousin brian was gunned down in the old colony housing project, next door where we grew up. i know what it's like to have a family member killed by gun violence. i think that far too many families in this country know that feeling. nd i know that there's a lot of -- there are a lot of families out ther
with viewers how have you used this technology? >> sure. the iran the targeting program in u.s. africa command from 2007 to 2010. you're right we don't call them drones. we call them remotely piloted aircraft. the key there it takes 200 people to keep one of these airborne for a 24-hour orbit. it has incredible level oversight scrutiny, intelligence, lawyers, commanders watching us use the tools. there are very legitimate questions as to whether we should use lethal force in the counterterrorism strategy overseas and how is that legal and whether it is the right strategy. once you decide to use lethal force and picking a platform, the rpas give you a tremendous amount of scrutiny, oversight, persistence, per significance and flexibility to abort at the last minute if the target moves or civilians come into the area. jenna: that is why i want to mention use of language is very important. when you say drone, oh, these are things flying around the skies. >> right. jenna: one person having a cup of coffee behind directs these type of things. as you point out that is not exactly the case. let's tal
with these technological advancements in aviation? >> well, you know, they can't keep up with all the various nuances and details of every new jet that comes along. they have to rely on boeing engineers. that's proper. that is of course, but overall, the faa, you know, has to listen to what boeing's saying, and in many ways, take word from it. it's worked before, it will work going forward. dagen: boeing has a lot to lose, not just in additional damage to the reputation, but also money and lost sales. to the point, mike, how much damage has been done to the company whether it's financial or image in terms of this grounding of what was considered this advanced airplane? >> well, the meter's running. face it. the airplanes coming off production line. they are sitting out there. they are not getting money for all the investment boeing has in those airplanes completed, but not deliver the. that's one issue. i think the other issue is will this harassment boeing's reputation going forward? not in the long term it won't. it will be put behind us and move ahead. boeing takes a hit, but one to be over fairly
to make one of those tech jobs mine. we teach cutting-edge engineering technology, computer information systems, networking and communications management -- the things that our students need to know in the world today. our country needs more college grads to help fill all the open technology jobs. to help meet that need, here at devry university, we're offering 4 million dollars in tech scholarships for qualified new students. learn more at devry.edu. for qualified new students. [ inhales, exhales ] [ announcer ] cigarettes are not just dangerous when they're smoked. [ rat squeaking ] they're dangerous long after. cigarette butts are toxic. they release chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> this is ktvu channel 2 news at 5. >>> recapping our top stories, south bay authorities say the two attacks on utility systems appear to be a coordinated act of sabotage. sheriff's investigators say someone shot up the pg&e facility with a high-powered rifle yesterday. there are no suspects in eithe
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